Forthcoming Walks and Tours

February 2019

Sunday 3 February 11am

Art Deco on Upper Street: Islington Town Hall Take an expert tour of Islington Town Hall and see some stunning original art deco style interiors and staircases, as well as the impressive council chamber in our 50 minute tour. Original clocks, paintings and decorative panels have survived for nearly a century in this lovely municipal building. Learn about the history and ambitions of the combined boroughs of Islington and Finsbury in the twentieth century.

Booking through Eventbrite

Guide: Oonagh 

Sunday 3 February 2pm

Dorothy L Sayers Bloomsbury Follow in the footsteps of Golden Age crime writer Dorothy L Sayers and her alter ego Harriet Vane.  Best known for her fiction, Dorothy L Sayers was a complex character: prize-winning linguist, translator, motorbike enthusiast and advertising copywriter. Discover some of the places and (sometimes surprising) events from her own life as an independent young woman in 1920’s London that inspired the novels . 2pm to 4pm

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Sue

Sunday 10 February 2pm

Radical Women of the East End Retrace the steps of the most famous radical women associated with Bow, starting with the Bryant and May matchwomen.  Sylvia Pankhurst established the Suffragette East London Federation here, campaigning not only for the right of women to vote, but also to establish their social and economic freedom. Minnie Lansbury died here, after a heroic fight for justice for local residents. We will re-locate past struggles for social justice and take a look at the modern Bow on the way.  2pm to 4pm

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9 

Guide: Oonagh 

Sunday  16 February  2pm

Ada Salter: Beautifying Bermondsey Ada Salter was the first female mayor in London and the first Labour woman mayor in the British Isles. With her husband, local doctor and MP Dr Alfred Salter, she made a significant impact on health, housing, employment and labour relations, helping to make Bermondsey world famous for its flowers and its Garden City estate, still occupied today.  Find out about the legacy of Ada on this charming riverside walk, which tells her story from the Bermondsey Uprising of women jam factory workers in 1911, to her years as a pacifist in the First World War, and her radical policies as Bermondsey Councillor. 2pm to 4pm

Booking through Eventbrite  £12/£9

Guide: Sue

Saturday 23 February 2pm

Radical Women of the East End Retrace the steps of the most famous radical women associated with Bow, starting with the Bryant and May matchwomen.  Sylvia Pankhurst established the Suffragette East London Federation here, campaigning not only for the right of women to vote, but also to establish their social and economic freedom. Minnie Lansbury died here, after a heroic fight for justice for local residents. We will re-locate past struggles for social justice and take a look at the modern Bow on the way.  2pm to 4pm

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9 

Guide: Oonagh 

Sunday 24 February  2pm

Marx, Lenin and Anarchism: Revolutionaries in Fitzrovia. London was the destination for communists and anarchists to meet and argue over the form that the coming revolution would take. Successive waves of exiles from France, Germany and Russia made a home in Fitzrovia, close to the British Museum where Marx and Lenin studied, yet in an area where foreigners ran the bookstores and shops. On this walk we will find the streets where the leading Communard Louise Michel lived and established a pioneering Fitrovia school, and revisit the site of the Autonomie anarchist club, linked by police to the Greenwich bomb of 1894 which inspired Joseph Conrad’s The Secret Agent.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9 

Guide: Oonagh 

 

March 2019

Sunday 3 March 2pm

Suffragette City London was at the centre of the suffragette protests just before the First World War, when the capital was rocked by arson attempts, hunger strikes and massive demonstrations. The walk will visit the church where Emily Wilding Davison’s funeral cortège began, and the headquarters of the Womens Social and Political Union, and the site of the Suffragette Hospital where all the staff, including surgeons, were women, dealing with soldiers straight from the trenches.Along the way we will explore vegetarian restaurants and the 1911 Census boycott.

Booking through Eventbrite  £12/£9

Guide: Oonagh 

Sunday 10 March 2pm

Ada Salter:Beautifying Bermondsey Ada Salter was the first female mayor in London and the first Labour woman mayor in the British Isles. With her husband, local doctor and MP Dr Alfred Salter, she made a significant impact on health, housing, employment and labour relations, helping to make Bermondsey world famous for its flowers and its Garden City estate, still occupied today.  Find out about the legacy of Ada on this charming riverside walk, which tells her story from the Bermondsey Uprising of women jam factory workers in 1911, to her years as a pacifist in the First World War, and her radical policies as Bermondsey Councillor. 2pm to 4pm

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Sue

Sunday 17  March  2pm

The Garretts of Gower Street Doctor, decorator, prisoner, politician, militant suffragette and mathematical genius. Join Sue in Bloomsbury to explore the life and legacy of the extraordinary women of the Garrett family.

Millicent led the non-violent suffragists, Elizabeth was the first woman to qualify in England as a doctor, Louisa ran a military hospital in WW1, Agnes and Rhoda established a top interior design company, Fanny was a landscape gardener, Philippa a brilliant mathematician and Amy set up a progressive school.  See the places they lived and worked and the legacy they left behind. 2pm to 4pm

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Sue 

Saturday 30 March 2pm

Dorothy L Sayers’ Bloomsbury  Follow in the footsteps of Golden Age crime writer Dorothy L Sayers and her alter ego Harriet Vane.  Best known for her fiction, Dorothy L Sayers was a complex character: prize-winning linguist, translator, motorbike enthusiast and advertising copywriter. Discover some of the places and (sometimes surprising) events from her own life as an independent young woman in 1920’s London that inspired the novels.   2pm to 4pm

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Sue

Sunday 31 March 2pm

Art & Industry in East London Roughly following the line of the Greenwich Meridian from the Bow Back Rivers at Pudding Mill Lane , this east London walk traces the industrial heritage of lower Lea Valley from fine porcelain in the 18th century, through gasworks, gin, cosmetics and explosives to film studios. As we go we follow part of The Line, London’s first dedicated modern and contemporary art walk.   We finish at the now green oasis of Gasworks Dock with the chance for refreshments before the a short walk to Star Lane DLR station. 2pm to 4pm

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Sue

April 2019

 

Sunday 7 April 2pm

Radical Women of the East End Retrace the steps of the most famous radical women associated with Bow, starting with the Bryant and May matchwomen.  Sylvia Pankhurst established the Suffragette East London Federation here, campaigning not only for the right of women to vote, but also to establish their social and economic freedom. Minnie Lansbury died here, after a heroic fight for justice for local residents. We will re-locate past struggles for social justice and take a look at the modern Bow on the way.  2pm to 4pm

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9 

Guide: Oonagh 

Sunday 14 April  2pm

Ada Salter: Beautifying Bermondsey Ada Salter was the first female mayor in London and the first Labour woman mayor in the British Isles. With her husband, local doctor and MP Dr Alfred Salter, she made a significant impact on health, housing, employment and labour relations, helping to make Bermondsey world famous for its flowers and its Garden City estate, still occupied today.  Find out about the legacy of Ada on this charming riverside walk, which tells her story from the Bermondsey Uprising of women jam factory workers in 1911, to her years as a pacifist in the First World War, and her radical policies as Bermondsey Councillor. 2pm to 4pm

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Sue

Friday 19 April 2pm

Dorothy L Sayers’ Bloomsbury  Follow in the footsteps of Golden Age crime writer Dorothy L Sayers and her alter ego Harriet Vane.  Best known for her fiction, Dorothy L Sayers was a complex character: prize-winning linguist, translator, motorbike enthusiast and advertising copywriter. Discover some of the places and (sometimes surprising) events from her own life as an independent young woman in 1920’s London that inspired the novels.   2pm to 4pm

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Sue

 

May 2019

Sunday 5 May 2pm

Radical Women of the East End Retrace the steps of the most famous radical women associated with Bow, starting with the Bryant and May matchwomen.  Sylvia Pankhurst established the Suffragette East London Federation here, campaigning not only for the right of women to vote, but also to establish their social and economic freedom. Minnie Lansbury died here, after a heroic fight for justice for local residents. We will re-locate past struggles for social justice and take a look at the modern Bow on the way.  2pm to 4pm

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9 

Guide: Oonagh 

June 2019

Saturday and Sunday 8 – 9 June

Watch this space for details of our walks for Open Garden Square Weekend

Friday 21 June 2:30 pm

From Nash to HS2: Boundaries of Change in the Regents Park Area This walk looks at the legacy of John Nash, who established the boundaries of Regent’s Park and associated developments. As well as the Regency Terraces, Nash created a service area of markets and small streets between Albany Street and Hampstead Road NW1, for the inhabitants who would assist the rich incomers to this fashionable new area of London. Bombing in World War Two and slum clearance, instigated by the radical St Pancras Borough, profoundly changed the character of the service area, which became the Regent’s Park Estate.  2:30pm to 4:30pm

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9 

Guide: Oonagh 

Sunday 30 June 11am

Capital Ring Section 13: Stoke Newington to Hackney Wick This section of the Capital Ring follows London’s second greatest river, the River Lea and the Lee Navigation. Enjoying a stroll through Springfield Park before we join the River by Springfield Marina, we then follow the towpath with Walthamstow Marshes and Hackney Marshes on our left and finish by the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, a short walk from Hackney Wick Station.

Along the way, there is historical and industrial interest as well as wildlife and water.  We pass the railway arch where A V Roe built his tri-plane and in 1909 achieved the first all-British powered flight, see the remains of the filter beds that provided drinking water for East London and encounter an outpost of Eton College. 11am to 2pm

This longer walk is part of Footprints of London Capital Ring walks

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide Sue or Oonagh

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