Forthcoming Walks and Tours

June 2019

Sunday 9 June 2pm

Fanny Wilkinson – Landscape Gardener. This walk from Tottenham Court Road through St Giles and Bloomsbury celebrates the life and work of Fanny Wilkinson, the first professional female landscape gardener: champion of tree planting for clean air and responsible for many of London’s parks and green spaces. Find out more about her life and legacy and see at some of her work.

This walk is being offered as part of Open Garden Squares Weekend  £3 Click here to book

Guide Sue 

Saturday 15 June 2pm

Marx, Lenin and Anarchism: Revolutionaries in Fitzrovia. London was the destination for communists and anarchists to meet and argue over the form that the coming revolution would take. Successive waves of exiles from France, Germany and Russia made a home in Fitzrovia, close to the British Museum where Marx and Lenin studied, yet in an area where foreigners ran the bookstores and shops. On this walk we will find the streets where the leading Communard Louise Michel lived and established a pioneering Fitrovia school, and revisit the site of the Autonomie anarchist club, linked by police to the Greenwich bomb of 1894 which inspired Joseph Conrad’s The Secret Agent.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9 

Guide: Oonagh 

Friday 21 June 2:30 pm London Festival of Architecture Walk

From Nash to HS2: Boundaries of Change in the Regents Park Area This walk looks at the legacy of John Nash, who established the boundaries of Regent’s Park and associated developments. As well as the Regency Terraces, Nash created a service area of markets and small streets between Albany Street and Hampstead Road NW1, for the inhabitants who would assist the rich incomers to this fashionable new area of London. Bombing in World War Two and slum clearance, instigated by the radical St Pancras Borough, profoundly changed the character of the service area, which became the Regent’s Park Estate.  2:30pm to 4:30pm

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9 

Guide: Oonagh 

Thursday 27 June 2.30pm London Festival of Architecture Walk

Isle of Dogs: The Boundaries between public and private housing The Isle of Dogs had a rich history of public housing, including outstanding 1920s Homes for Heroes estates built by radical Poplar councillors in the era before the Docklands Development Corporation initiated a private sector led renewal . Private housing has come to dominate the Island in just a generation, since the creation of Canary Wharf. This walk traces the boundaries between private and public housing in this fascinating tour of the western Isle of Dogs, ending near Mudchute DLR.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9 

Guide: Oonagh 

Sunday 30 June 11am

Capital Ring Section 13: Stoke Newington to Hackney Wick This section of the Capital Ring follows London’s second greatest river, the River Lea and the Lee Navigation. Enjoying a stroll through Springfield Park before we join the River by Springfield Marina, we then follow the towpath with Walthamstow Marshes and Hackney Marshes on our left and finish by the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, a short walk from Hackney Wick Station.

Along the way, there is historical and industrial interest as well as wildlife and water.  We pass the railway arch where A V Roe built his tri-plane and in 1909 achieved the first all-British powered flight, see the remains of the filter beds that provided drinking water for East London and encounter an outpost of Eton College. 11am to 2pm

This longer walk is part of Footprints of London Capital Ring walks

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide Sue 

July 2019

Saturday 13 July 11am FREE WALK BOOKING ESSENTIAL

Holloway has attracted writers since the Victorian building boom created the street pattern we know today. As we walk down and around Holloway Road we travel in time from the brickfields of Dickens’ Our Mutual Friend, through The Laurels of The Diary of a Nobody’s Mr Pooter to the modern flats and houses of Nick Hornby and Sarah Dunant to finish at the Prison. From sex scandal in school, to zombies in Waitrose, from Horrid Henry to the Pobble with no Toes; journalism, screenplay, stories for children and adults – Holloway has it all!

This is a free walk generously funded by Islington Library and Heritage Service but booking is essential.

This is one of a series of four new walks on a literary theme designed by Islington Guided Walk guides to mark the publication of a Literary Road Map of Islington. The map has been created by Islington Library and HeritageService and like the walks celebrates the borough’s long, rich heritage of authors, screenwriters, poets and writers who have lived in Islington, and the literary works which have been inspired by and set in Islington.

Booking through Eventbrite

Guide Sue 

Sunday 14 July 11am FREE WALK BOOKING ESSENTIAL

Explore some of the pioneer women of Crouch End on this free walk, part of the Haringey Festival of Learning. Discover suffragette and teacher’s leader Theodora Bonwick, as well as the first woman Permanent Secretary of a Government Department. Evelyn Sharp, and a host of other remarkable women of Crouch End. On the lighter side, learn how Alexandra Park was the practice ground for the first English ladies football team, and how being thrown out of the Queen’s pub in the Broadway led to a famous pop partnership. The Haringey Festival of Learning promotes new activities designed to promote wellness.https://www.festivaloflearning.org.uk/ There is a short form to complete on arrival at the walk.

Booking through Eventbrite

Guide: Oonagh 

Saturday 20 July 2pm

Ada Salter: Beautifying Bermondsey Ada Salter was the first female mayor in London and the first Labour woman mayor in the British Isles. With her husband, local doctor and MP Dr Alfred Salter, she made a significant impact on health, housing, employment and labour relations, helping to make Bermondsey world famous for its flowers and its Garden City estate, still occupied today.  Find out about the legacy of Ada on this charming riverside walk, which tells her story from the Bermondsey Uprising of women jam factory workers in 1911, to her years as a pacifist in the First World War, and her radical policies as Bermondsey Councillor.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide Sue 

Saturday 27 July 2pm

Suffragette City London was at the centre of the suffragette protests just before the First World War, when the capital was rocked by arson attempts, hunger strikes and massive demonstrations. The walk will visit the church where Emily Wilding Davison’s funeral cortège began, and the headquarters of the Women’s Social and Political Union, and the site of the Suffragette Hospital where all the staff, including surgeons, were women, dealing with soldiers straight from the trenches. Along the way we will explore vegetarian restaurants and the 1911 Census boycott.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Oonagh 

August 2019

Saturday 3 August 2pm

Art & Industry in East London Roughly following the line of the Greenwich Meridian from the Bow Back Rivers at Pudding Mill Lane , this east London walk traces the industrial heritage of lower Lea Valley from fine porcelain in the 18th century, through gasworks, gin, cosmetics and explosives to film studios. As we go we follow part of The Line, London’s first dedicated modern and contemporary art walk.   We finish at the now green oasis of Gasworks Dock with the chance for refreshments before the a short walk to Star Lane DLR station. 2pm to 4pm

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide Sue 

Sunday 4 August 2pm

Radical Women of the East End Retrace the steps of the most famous radical women associated with Bow, starting with the Bryant and May matchwomen.  Sylvia Pankhurst established the Suffragette East London Federation here, campaigning not only for the right of women to vote, but also to establish their social and economic freedom. Minnie Lansbury died here, after a heroic fight for justice for local residents. We will re-locate past struggles for social justice and take a look at the modern Bow on the way.  2pm to 4pm

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9 

Guide: Oonagh 

Sunday 11 August 2pm

Art & Industry in East London Roughly following the line of the Greenwich Meridian from the Bow Back Rivers at Pudding Mill Lane , this east London walk traces the industrial heritage of lower Lea Valley from fine porcelain in the 18th century, through gasworks, gin, cosmetics and explosives to film studios. As we go we follow part of The Line, London’s first dedicated modern and contemporary art walk.   We finish at the now green oasis of Gasworks Dock with the chance for refreshments before the a short walk to Star Lane DLR station. 2pm to 4pm

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide Sue

Saturday 24 August 2pm

Ada Salter: Beautifying Bermondsey Ada Salter was the first female mayor in London and the first Labour woman mayor in the British Isles. With her husband, local doctor and MP Dr Alfred Salter, she made a significant impact on health, housing, employment and labour relations, helping to make Bermondsey world famous for its flowers and its Garden City estate, still occupied today.  Find out about the legacy of Ada on this charming riverside walk, which tells her story from the Bermondsey Uprising of women jam factory workers in 1911, to her years as a pacifist in the First World War, and her radical policies as Bermondsey Councillor.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide Sue 

Monday 26 August 2pm

Radical Women of the West End  Discover the radical women of Fitzrovia from Mary Wollstonecraft, author of “A Vindication of the Rights of woman’  to activist and writer Una Marson, the first Black broadcaster at the BBC.  French anarchist Louise Michel established an International school here. Suffragists Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence and Lily Montagu  pioneered community work with young women working in the rag trade; Marie Stopes opened the first birth control clinic and the Rossetti children published a journal endorsed by Kropotkin with contributions by George Bernard Shaw and Zola.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide Sue 

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