Forthcoming Walks and Tours

February 2020

Saturday 15 February 2020 2pm New walk!

Mary Wollstonecraft: Chapels and Change in Newington Green In the years before the French Revolution, Mary Wollstonecraft opened a school in Newington Green, Canonbury, and joined a network of radicals based around the Unitarian Chapel on the Green. She developed her ideas on female and male rights as part of this immersive experience. Follow in her footsteps to explore this historic green and the developing Victorian suburb of Canonbury, home to other radicals such as George Orwell and visited by Sylvia Pankhurst and Vladimir Lenin in the turbulent decade before the First World War.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Oonagh 

Wednesday 19 February 2020 11am Half-term Wednesday walk!

Beastly Islington What part did animals play in the development of Islington as the open fields gave way to the inner city?  What was it like when when cattle, pigs and geese were driven through the streets to the live meat market at Smithfield and just how much dung did horse-drawn carriages dump on London streets?  From performing animals to beasts of burden, working animals played an important part in the life of our ancestors.  Discover how a fancy to milk a cow led to the founding of a school, about the local lad responsible for a world famous dog show and the people who promoted animal welfare. Join Sue to find out what it was really like for animals and humans to live so closely together.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9 (Children go free)

Guide: Sue 

March 2020

Wednesday 4 March 2020 11am new Wednesday walks!

The Garretts of Gower Street Doctor, decorator, prisoner, politician, militant suffragette and mathematical genius. Join Sue in Bloomsbury to explore the life and legacy of the extraordinary women of the Garrett family. Millicent led the non-violent suffragists, Elizabeth was the first woman to qualify in England as a doctor, Louisa ran a military hospital in WW1, Agnes and Rhoda established a top interior design company, Fanny was a landscape gardener, Philippa a brilliant mathematician and Amy set up a progressive school. See the places they lived and worked and the legacy they left behind

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Sue 

Sunday 8 March 2020 3pm

Dorothy L Sayers Bloomsbury One of the “golden age” crime writers between the first and second world wars, Dorothy L Sayers lived and worked in Holborn and Bloomsbury  – as did her alter ego, Harriet Vane and other familiar characters from the novels and short stories.  See places from which she took inspiration for her detective fiction; find out more about Sayers’ characters and about the woman who brought them all to life.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Sue 

Friday 13 March 2020 2pm

Canonbury Tower Tour Come and explore the inside and outside of one of Islington’s historic jewels – the Canonbury Tower. Originally built in the early 1500s by Prior Bolton of St Bartholomew’s Priory as a summer retreat, the Tower has a fascinating history, and was owned by Thomas Cromwell (of Wolf Hall fame) and at one time occupied by novelist Oliver Goldsmith

Booking through Islington Guided Walks Eventbrite £15

Guide: Sue 

Saturday 14 March 2020 11am

Ada Salter: Beautifying Bermondsey Ada Salter was the first female mayor in London and the first Labour woman mayor in the British Isles. With her husband, local doctor and MP Dr Alfred Salter, she made a significant impact on health, housing, employment and labour relations, helping to make Bermondsey world famous for its flowers and its Garden City estate, still occupied today.  Find out about the legacy of Ada on this charming riverside walk, which tells her story from the Bermondsey Uprising of women jam factory workers in 1911, to her years as a pacifist in the First World War, and her radical policies as Bermondsey Councillor.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Sue 

Wednesday 18 March 2020 2pm new Wednesday walks!

Women in the Blitz: Bloomsbury Second World War novels The Second World War was both terrifying and liberating for women in London. Women could operate machinery, become ambulance drivers, and work for the BBC and Ministry of Information- previously reserved for men.But death was all around, encouraging short term romances and heartbreak. . Elizabeth Bowen and Muriel Spark transposed war time events into their literary output. Pat Barker and Sarah Waters have used the period and location brilliantly in recent novels. Graham Greene wrote thrillers and The End of the Affair, illuminating the moral choices of women. This walk highlights important events which formed the basis of these novels, and looks at some of the main landmarks of the Blitz in Bloomsbury

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Oonagh 

Saturday 21 March 2020 2pm New Walk!

Pioneers, Poets and Pacifists Celebrate World Poetry Day and International Women’s Month and discover twelve women who have made an important contribution to society. Either they are not as well known as they should be, or an important aspect of their life is  overlooked. Three poets, three pacifists and ten pioneers in medicine, science, technology and education from the ninteenth century to the present day. Not the usual Bloomsbury suspects! Stroll through the squares with Sue and find out who they are.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Sue

Sunday 22 March 2pm

Radical Women of the East End Retrace the steps of the most famous radical women associated with Bow, starting with the Bryant and May matchwomen. Sylvia Pankhurst established the Suffragette East London Federation here, campaigning not only for the right of women to vote, but also to establish their social and economic freedom. Minnie Lansbury died here, after a heroic fight for justice for local residents. We will re-locate past struggles for social justice and take a look at the modern Bow on the way.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Oonagh 

Saturday 28 March 2020 2pm

Radical Women of the West End Discover the radical women of Fitzrovia from Mary Wollstonecraft, author of “A Vindication of the Rights of woman’  to activist and writer Una Marson, the first Black broadcaster at the BBC.  French anarchist Louise Michel established an International school here. Suffragists Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence and Lily Montagu pioneered community work with young women working in the rag trade; Marie Stopes opened the first birth control clinic and the Rossetti children published a journal endorsed by Kropotkin with contributions by George Bernard Shaw and Zola.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Sue

April 2020

Wednesday 1 April 2020 11am new Wednesday walks!

Beastly Islington What part did animals play in the development of Islington as the open fields gave way to the inner city?  What was it like when when cattle, pigs and geese were driven through the streets to the live meat market at Smithfield and just how much dung did horse-drawn carriages dump on London streets?  From performing animals to beasts of burden, working animals played an important part in the life of our ancestors.  Discover how a fancy to milk a cow led to the founding of a school, about the local lad responsible for a world famous dog show and the people who promoted animal welfare. Join Sue to find out what it was really like for animals and humans to live so closely together.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Sue 

Saturday 17 April 2pm

Art & Industry in East London Roughly following the line of the Greenwich Meridian from the Bow Back Rivers at Pudding Mill Lane , this east London walk traces the industrial heritage of lower Lea Valley from fine porcelain in the 18th century, through gasworks, gin, cosmetics and explosives to film studios. As we go we follow part of The Line, London’s first dedicated modern and contemporary art walk.   We finish at the now green oasis of Gasworks Dock with the chance for refreshments before the a short walk to Star Lane DLR station.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Wednesday 22 April 2pm new Wednesday walks!

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/for-the-many-chartists-and-marxists-in-soho-tickets-94655028739

Suffragette City London was at the centre of the suffragette protests just before the First World War, when the capital was rocked by arson attempts, hunger strikes and massive demonstrations. The walk will visit the church where Emily Wilding Davison’s funeral cortège began, and the headquarters of the Womens Social and Political Union, and the site of the Suffragette Hospital where all the staff, including surgeons, were women, dealing with soldiers straight from the trenches.Along the way we will explore vegetarian restaurants and the 1911 Census boycott.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

GuideOonagh 

Saturday 25 April 2pm new walk!

For the Many: Chartists and Marxists in Soho. Soho in the nineteenth century was a ferment of revolutionary thought. Briefly home to both Blake and Shelley, the Chartists met in a series of Soho pubs to plan for mass democracy. A decade later, Karl Marx was one step away from destitution while living in Dean Street,writing Das Kapital and taking part in the First International of trade unionists and socialists. This walk explores surviving buildings and streets of the period and examines the public health challenges caused by rapid population growth and destitution. Eleanor Marx was one of the children to survive- three of her siblings did not.

Booking through Eventbrite £12/£9

Guide: Oonagh